Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
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Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife

Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife




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Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

As we begin this new year, I'd like to challenge all of you to think about what you can do for Tennessee's wildlife and for conservation in our State:

Buy shade grown organic coffee for instance. Study after study has proven that coffee beans grown on these vincas outshines sun-grown coffee in terms of increased numbers of birds, improved habitat, soil pro- tection and erosion control, carbon sequestration, natural pest control and improved pollination.

Make your windows safer, day and night. Turn off lights at night and explore options like window tape and ‘zen curtains’ to keep birds from flying into the reflection of the foliage in your windows in the daytime. You can see some of these options and learn more when visiting Shelby Bottoms Nature Center in Nashville.

Keep cats indoors. It’s better for your cat and helps prevent need- less killings of birds, amphibians and reptiles.

Lend your eyes and ears. Citizen science is an indispensable tool for monitoring our environment. Your observations along with those scattered across the globe provide valuable data. Find a project and volun- teer to participate in it.

Help a child discover birds and forge a lifelong connection with nature. TOS and TWRA has a wonderful resource with our own Discover Bird Activity Books. https://tnbirds.org/education/ They’re free of charge and a great resource. Ask me about how you can get them for a child in your life.

As youre planning your spring garden consider native plants. From window boxes to vast meadows the plants you grow can make a big difference to birds. Embrace your ‘patch’ of land and make the most of it.

Buy a Migratory Bird Stamp. A full 98% of the face value of stamp goes to maintaining land on National Wildlife Refuges.

Reduce your use of plastics and recycle

Support organizations that work tirelessly for conservation. Each of us can and do make a difference with our actions. I hope you’ll consider adding one or more of these options in 2023 to what you already do for birds and conservation!

IMPORTANT NOTICE: If you encounter a sick bird please report it to the link below. If you encounter an injured bird please contact your nearest rehabber. Please continue weekly maintenaince on your seed feeders. Anytime birds artificially gather together to feed there is always the chance of transmission of disease so cleanliness is essential. If you encounter sick or dead birds here's the link to TWRA at: Sick Birds

That same site should also have the most up-to-date information on bird flu and help guide you to doing what's best for our feathered friends.













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Welcome The Newest Additions To The Eastern Golden Eagle Research Project

Two new Golden Eagles have been trapped in Tennessee. One on Bear Hollow WMA named Bear Hollow and another trapped on Prentice Cooper WMA.

Please visit the TN Golden Eagle Reasearch page for more information.
Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
PHOTO GALLERY

PHOTO GALLERY

We love seeing your photos of the wildlife in Tennessee. Click here to submit yours and check back to see them each month.
Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
PHOTO GALLERY

CRITTER OF THE MONTH

The Blue Jay is a member of the corvid family. It's unmistakenable bright blue plumage and loud calls it is easy bird spot.
Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife
PHOTO GALLERY

Are you watching for winter hummingbirds like this banded one in Davidson County??


Tennessee's Watchable Wildlife

DOWNLOAD DISCOVER BIRDS

A wonderfully fun, informative and FREE educational booklet sponsored by the Tennessee Ornithological Society and TWRA. Get your hard copy by emailing routledges@bellsouth.net or click here to download. Also available for download in Spanish.

USE eBIRD

Check out the NEW mobile APP for eBird!

Click here for more info.





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